February 21, Dingxin Zhao, “Social change of the Longue Duree”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 Social Change of the Longue Duree: A theory and its application”

Dingxin Zhao

Max Palevsky Professor, Department of Sociology

University of Chicago

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be served*

Abstract

This talk presents a general theory of social change proposed in my new book “Confucian-Legalist State.” The theory is based on the premise that human nature has political, ideological, territorial and economic aspects, and humans compete for dominance and try to institutionalize the gains along these aspects. The bulk of the theory is to analyze how each of the four aspects of human nature has given rise to distinctive mechanisms and institutions shaping the contours of history. The empirical implications of the theory will be illustrated by the patterns of the world history, particularly the premodern history of China and Europe. More specifically, I will try to explain why China was able to achieve a unified and bureaucratic empire in the Qin Dynasty (221-206 BCE), and why the imperial/cultural structure emerging during the Qin and Han Dynasties showed great resilience, despite the challenges brought by nomadic conquests, population growth, technological changes, commercial growth, the rise of new ideas and religions, up until the rise of the West in the 19th century.

About the Speaker

Professor Dingxin Zhao is Max Palevsky Professor of Sociology at the University of Chicago. He is interested in political sociology broadly defined, as well as comparative historical sociology, sociology of emotion, ecological sociology, sociological theory and methodology. Prof. Zhao is the author of The Power of Tiananmen: State-Society Relations and the 1989 Beijing Student Movement, and most recently: The Confucian-Legalist State: A New Theory of Chinese History.  Prof. Zhao holds a B.A. from Fudan University, a Ph.D. in Entomology and also a Ph.D. in Sociology from McGill University.

* To learn more about our Winter program, please look at: Winter Schedule

 

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology), Dali Yang (Political Science), and Dingxin Zhao (Sociology)


The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

 

 

February 14, Wei Shen, “Interplay between Centralized Judicial Control and Local Protectionism”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 Interplay between Centralized Judicial Control and Local Protectionism

Empirical Study of China Supreme People’s Court’s Decisions

on Non-enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards (1995-2015)”

Wei Shen

Dean and Professor of Law, Law School

Shandong University

4:30-6:00 p.m., Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be served*

Abstract

In an effort to fight against local protectionism in court enforcement proceedings, China’s Supreme People’s Court promulgated its Notice on Relevant Issues Pertaining to the People’s Court Handling Foreign and Foreign-Related Arbitration in 1995. Pursuant to this Notice, China’s Intermediate People’s Courts will have to wait until the Supreme People’s Court’s approval of its decision not to enforce any foreign or foreign-related arbitral award. However, the effectiveness of this internal reporting mechanism in constraining local protectionism has never been empirically tested. This empirical study, based on 98 publicly available non-enforcement reply opinions rendered by China’s Supreme People’s Court to lower courts after those lower courts have made and reported preliminary non-enforcement decisions up to the Supreme People’s Court, analyzes whether these non-enforcement decisions have shown any pattern of local protectionism. Although statistical results do not suggest that local protectionism has been a major barrier hindering effective enforcement of foreign or foreign-related arbitral awards in China, we argue that this internal reporting system may also serve other functions. For instance, it provides an alternative tool to reinforce judicial oversight in spite of China’s weak appellant system. At the same time, the Chinese government seems to rely on this internal reporting system to achieve important policy goals. In this sense, analyzing the functionality of this internal reporting system offers us insights of the role top-level judicial control could play China without an independent court system.

About the Speaker

Professor Shen is a Global Professor of Law at New York University School of Law, an associate member of the International Academy of Comparative Law, a member of Moody’s China Academic Advisory Panel, and an Honorary Fellow of Asian Institute of International Financial Law, University of Hong Kong, and has been included in Marquis Who’s Who (2011 onwards). Professor Shen is also a leading expert on international commercial arbitration. He is an arbitrator with Hong Kong International Arbitration Centre, Singapore International Arbitration Centre, Shanghai International Arbitration Centre, among others.

Professor Shen authored seven books, the most recent of which are Shadow Banking in China: Risk, Regulation and Policy (Edward Elgar 2016), and Chinese Business Law: Narrative and Commentary (Wolters Kluwer 2016).  He also serves as an editor of multiple journals, including the Chinese Journal of International Law (SSCI, Oxford University Press) and Journal of East Asia and International Law (SSCI).

Prior to teaching at the law school, Professor Shen practiced in major US and UK firms in Shanghai, Chicago and Hong Kong for a decade. Professor Shen holds a PhD from London School of Economics and Political Science and L.L.M from University of Cambridge and University of Michigan.

* Our full Winter 2017 schedule is available at: Winter Schedule 

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology), Dali Yang (Political Science), and Dingxin Zhao (Sociology)


The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences and Center for East Asian Studies. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

February 7, Rory Truex, “Authoritarian Gridlock? Haste and Delay in the Chinese Legislative System.”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

Authoritarian Gridlock? Haste and Delay in the Chinese Legislative System.”

Rory Truex

Assistant Professor, Department of Politics and Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.

Princeton University

4:30-6:00 p.m., Tuesday, February 7, 2017

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be served*

Abstract

Policy gridlock is often viewed as a uniquely democratic phenomenon. The checks and balances that produce gridlock are absent from authoritarian systems, leading many observers to romanticize “authoritarian efficiency” and policy dynamism. This paper develops a theory that relates authoritarian policy change to the presence of “soft vetoes” within the ruling coalition and citizen attention shocks. A unique law-level dataset from the Chinese case shows that roughly one third of laws are not passed within the period specified in legislative plans, and about 10% of laws take over ten years to pass. Qualitative analysis of China’s Food Safety Law, coupled with shadow case studies of two other laws, demonstrates the plausibility of the theory.

About the Speaker

Rory Truex is Assistant Professor of Politics and Public Affairs. His research focuses on Chinese politics and theories of authoritarian rule. His book Making Autocracy Work: Representation and Responsiveness in Modern China investigates the nature of representation in authoritarian systems, specifically the politics surrounding China’s National People’s Congress. His research has also been featured in the Wall Street Journal and New York Times. Currently, Prof. Truex is working on a new project exploring whether Chinese citizens believe state-controlled newspapers, the temporal determinants of dissident behavior and crackdowns, and new ways to measure public opinion. Prof. Truex received his undergraduate degree from Princeton in 2007 and Ph.D. in political science from Yale in 2014.

*To see the full Winter 2017 schedule: Winter Schedule

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology) Dali Yang (Political Science) Dingxin Zhao (Sociology)


This particular East Asia Workshop event is sponsored by the Committee on Chinese Studies at the Center for East Asian Studies and with support from a Title VI National Resource Center Grant from the United States Department of Education. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

 

January 24, Linzhuo Li, “Politics Beyond the Ocean: Ideological upheaval and community metabolism in China’s cyber space”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

  Politics Beyond the Ocean: Ideological upheaval and community metabolism in China’s cyber space”

Linzhuo Li

PhD student, Department of Sociology

University of Chicago

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, January 24, 2017

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be served*

Abstract

This research analyzes the political debates of U.S. Presidential Election on “Zhihu”, one of China’s top online knowledge sharing communities and aims to explain why the dominant voices in the community turned from pro-liberal before the election to pro-conservative after. Using community detection methods, the research discovers three ideologically distinct groups: pro-liberal, pro-conservative, and mixed-nationalism. The research also finds that the ideological divergence corresponds with user’s community status. The pro-liberal group is mainly of “big VIP” users, featuring a friendship network while the pro-conservative group has mostly ordinary users, featuring a mobilization network. Finally, by tracing the interactions among key answerers and their user life histories, the research tries to form an explanation based on community politics and user metabolism to understand this online political upheaval.

About the Speaker

Linzhuo Li is a 3rd year PhD student in the Department of Sociology. He is interested in using network analysis and content analysis to understand dynamics of online community. He is also interested in sociology of finance, especially about local financial transformation in China, a project that may take him several years to finish. In addition, he is currently also involved in a computational content analysis project, with his colleague Shilin Jia, tracking changing economic rhetoric in 60 years of the People’s Daily.

*To see the full Winter 2017 schedule: Winter Schedule

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology) Dali Yang (Political Science) Dingxin Zhao (Sociology)


The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

 

 

January 17, Le Lin, “Capitalism Out of the Shadow: Double Ambiguity and the Privatization and Marketization of China’s Education and Training Industry”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

Capitalism Out of the Shadow: Double Ambiguity and the Privatization and Marketization of China’s Education and Training Industry”

Le Lin

PhD Candidate, Department of Sociology

University of Copenhagen

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be served*

Abstract

This article presents a novel bottom-up development trajectory of China’s private economy by drawing on the education and training industry (ETI) and other doubly ambiguous industries. Organizations in these industries used to be ambiguous both in terms of whether they were private and whether they were for-profit. Based on primary data on eight organizations and secondary data on an additional twelve, I explore why and how prototypical private enterprises thrived in the ETI, despite systematic restrictions placed on private ownership and for-profit activities in this industry by the Chinese state. Specifically, why did a particular model of prototypical private enterprises that was more deviant from state regulations and informal cooperation norms than other models become dominant? I found that the ETI relied on the state and the second economy for resources and organizational repertoires. Private entrepreneurs in the ETI blended elements of these two divergent sources into new and deviant practices. I argue that the more deviant model not only benefited from the structural condition of double ambiguity, but their deviant practices were made more effective and less likely to be sanctioned under such condition. In ambiguous social spaces, norm deviance is the primary engine for initial capitalistic development. As prototypical private enterprises outcompeted state-affiliated and other less deviant enterprises, they became rule-makers and pushed the marketization and privatization of the industry from below. My study has important implications for the origins and size of China’s private sector, the role of the sate in market transition and organizational theories.

About the Speaker

Le Lin is a PhD Candidate in Sociology and the William Rainey Harper Provost Fellow at the University of Chicago. His research interests include formal and complex organizations, economic sociology, work and occupations, education and contemporary Chinese society. Specifically, he studies why transitional economies’ organizational fields, such as education and medicine that used to be the epitome of the socialist welfare system and that have been tightly controlled by the state, have become privatized and marketized. Currently, he is working on his dissertation that examines how China’s education and training industry grows out of the state’s resources, tight regulations and the second economy’s organizational repertoires. He holds a B.A. in Economics from Zhejiang University, an M.A. in Education from Columbia University (Teachers College) and an M.A. in Sociology from the University of Chicago.

*To see the full Winter 2017 schedule: Winter Schedule

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology), Dali Yang (Political Science), and Dingxin Zhao (Sociology)


The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

 

 

January 10, Peter Bang, “Between China and Rome: The challenge of pre-colonial world history”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

“Between China and Rome: The challenge of pre-colonial world history

Peter Fibiger Bang

Professor, The Saxo Institute

University of Copenhagen

Discussant: Kenneth Pomeranz

University Professor, Department of History

University of Chicago

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, January 10, 2017

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be served*

Abstract

This paper explores alternative frameworks for a pre-colonial world history, in other words it sets out in search of a conceptualisation for a time before the world became Eurocentric and subject to the rule of European states. Most recent attempts while seeking to overcome the latent eurocentrism of previous world history, nevertheless end up reproducing the chronology, patterns and models developed for Europe. So scholarship invests in categories such as early modernity or the middle ages and try to expand them to reach global coverage. But, both the Chinese and the Roman experience, suggest a radically different take on this challenge: universal empire may serve as one very significant category under which to subsume much of pre-colonial Eurasian history.

About the Speaker

Professor Peter Fibiger Bang is a comparative historian. His research is situated at the interface of ancient and world history. It is focused on exploring historical comparisons between the Roman and other pre-colonial land-empires. His primary fields of research include the Roman Empire, imperialism in world history, the ancient economy, and global and comparative history. Prof. Bang got his PhD at University of Cambridge and is now teaching at the University of Copenhagen.

*To see the full Winter 2017 schedule: Winter Schedule

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology), Dali Yang (Political Science), and Dingxin Zhao (Sociology)


The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

Winter 2017 Schedule

EAST ASIA WORKSHOP: POLITICS, ECONOMY & SOCIETY

Winter 2017 Workshop Schedule

 

January 10

“Between China and Rome: The challenge of pre-colonial world history”

Peter Fibiger Bang

Professor, The Saxo Institute

University of Copenhagen

Discussant: Kenneth Pomeranz

University Professor, Department of History

University of Chicago

 

January 17

“Capitalism Out of the Shadow: Double ambiguity and the thriving of private enterprises in China’s education and training industry”

Le Lin

PhD Candidate, Department of Sociology

University of Chicago

 

January 24

“Politics beyond the ocean: knowledge production of U.S. presidential election in a Chinese Q&A community”

Linzhuo Li

PhD student, Department of Sociology

University of Chicago

 

February 7

“Authoritarian Gridlock? Haste and Delay in the Chinese Legislative System.”

Rory Truex

Professor, Department of Politics

University of Princeton

 

February 21

“Social Change of the Longue Duree: A theory and its application”

Dingxin Zhao

Max Palevsky Professor, Department of Sociology

University of Chicago

 

March 7

“Continuity and Change of Authority Structures: Indigenous Party Identification in Taiwan”

Wanzi Lu

PhD student, Department of Sociology

University of Chicago

Unless otherwise stated, the East Asia Workshop meets on alternate Tuesdays 4:30-6pm at Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Avenue. This workshop features interdisciplinary scholarship addressing topics relating to social, political, economic and cultural matters in East Asia. Our presenters come from different disciplines like sociology, political science, economics, history, and so on.

Faculty Sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology), Dali Yang (Political Science), and Dingxin Zhao (Sociology)


The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

November 29, Victor Yuan, “Public Opinion and Public Policy in China: Insights from the Dataway Horizon”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 

Public Opinion and Public Policy in China: Insights from Dataway Horizon”

Victor Yuan

Chairman

Dataway Horizon

Moderated by Prof. Dali Yang

Department of Political Science, University of Chicago

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be served*

Description

Dr. Victor Yuan leads Dataway Horizon (former Horizon Research Consultancy Group, 零点研究调查集团), one of China’s leading public opinion and polling firms. With a solid experience in data collection and analysis for more than 20 years, Victor has successfully applied socially oriented polling work to encourage policy makers to increase NGO services for homeless people, to revamp HIV/AIDS prevention programs, to assist migrant workers integrate into urban communities, and to improve human rights environments inside factories. Victor has also been leading an international effort to enhance the transparency of the Chinese government by overseeing annual assessments of public officials in China. During this event, Victor will be talking about his experience doing polls in China, as well as providing us fresh data and insights on Chinese public opinion and policies.

About Dataway Horizon

Dataway Horizon is an international organization based in China providing data intelligence service. It has carried out multiple practices in providing various services to the governments, large enterprises, start-ups, and non-governmental organizations both domestically and internationally. Also, Dataway Horizon fastens attention on innovative services and products under the Internet economy, and exhausts capabilities in data mining and analyzing merged data streams to support the clients’ strategies with respect to economic, social, cultural development and policy-making.

About the Speaker

Dr. Victor Yuan is the chairman of the board, founder, and president of Dataway Horizon, which he founded in 1992. He has had 20 years of experience in professional marketing, social research and policy analysis, and management consulting. Beyond these, Dr. Yuan serves as president of the Beijing Consulting Association, vice president for China Marketing Research Association, representative of the Association of Management Consulting Firms in China, and adjunct professor for Tsinghua, Nankai, and Southwest Jiaotong universities.

Dr. Yuan holds a Ph.D. in sociology from Peking University and an MPA from the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.

*To see the full autumn 2016 schedule: Autumn Schedule

*Questions and concerns can be addressed to the student coordinator Yinxian Zhang (zyxzhang@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology), Dali Yang (Political Science), and Dingxin Zhao (Sociology)


The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

 

November 15, Wen Xie, “The Making of the Chinese Rustbelt: Work, Welfare and Industrial Transformation in Northeast China, 1949-2015”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents 

 

The Making of the Chinese Rustbelt: Work, Welfare and Industrial Transformation in Northeast China, 1949-2015”

Wen Xie

PhD Student, Department of Sociology

University of Chicago

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be served*

Abstract

My ongoing dissertation project examines the entanglement of historical legacies, human lives, and global/national politico-economic transformations in northeast China, the once socialist heavy industrial heartland that is now the epitome of the Chinese “rustbelt.” Existing literature focuses either on characteristics of social protests or the economic development outcome. Bridging the economic and political dimensions of the transformation, my approach centers on generational experiences as a nexus between the country’s socialist past and capitalist/neoliberal present to illuminate the complexities of how historical legacies have interacted with globalization, shifting national policy priorities and local institutions, and channeled into the present market economy and non-socialist welfare system. I place the life experience of a generation spanning Mao’s era (1949-1976), market reform (1977-1992), and the country’s neoliberal turn (1992-2015), the center of this industrial heartland’s transformation. This project draws on ethnographic observations, interviews and archival data from multiple places in the region. At the workshop, I will present my overarching theoretical framework, research design and preliminary empirical findings.

About the speaker:

Wen Xie is a 5th year PhD student in sociology. She is broadly interested in economic sociology, comparative historical sociology, regional political economy, and labor issues. A central interest driving her past and ongoing projects is politico-economic transformations and social consequences in China since 1949.

* To see the full Autumn 2016 schedule: Autumn 2016 Schedule

* Questions and concerns can be addressed to the student coordinator Yinxian Zhang (zyxzhang@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology), Dali Yang (Political Science), and Dingxin Zhao (Sociology)


The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

 

November 1, Shilin Jia, “Organizational Identity and Metabolism: Inter-organizational Mobility of Political Elites in CCP China, 1977-2012.”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 

Organizational Identity and Metabolism: Inter-organizational Mobility of Political Elites in CCP China, 1977-2012.”

Shilin Jia

PhD Student, Department of Sociology

University of Chicago

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, November 1, 2016

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be served*

Abstract

How would a large and complex social organism reproduce itself while all of its members are always in flows? How could it maintain its unity with spatial and functional differentiation? Are identity and change not only always coexisting but also mutually constitutive? The co-presence of large-scale institutional realignment and political unity in the Chinese communist party state during the past 30 to 40 years poses an intriguing case for studying the classical question of how social institutions persist and evolve out of complex and often contradictory social relationships. By machine-coding the CVs of over 8000 Chinese political elites and analyzing their career flows during the period, this study reveals the changing patterns of how Chinese political elites have been transferred across different geographical and functional domains (provinces and ministries). The changing coupling and de-coupling patterns suggest some significant reorientation of “mobility as control” mechanism during the process of the party state’s institutional evolution from a centrally planned system to the multifaceted Leviathan at the current stage with coexisting centrifugal and centripetal forces represented by clear division of labor and highly frequent circular job movements.

Note: A network visualization of the study can be viewed at https://www.dropbox.com/s/4g4lmlsnb1urc6b/output_3.wmv.

About the speaker:

Shilin Jia is a 3rd year PhD student in the Department of Sociology. He is interested in applying computational methods to studying macro social-historical change and modeling large-scale stochastic social processes in continuous time. He also has a broad interest in sociological theory and quantitative methodology. In addition to the Chinese bureaucratic circulation project he has spent almost forever working on, Jia is currently also involved in a computational content analysis project, with his colleague Linzhuo Li, tracking changing economic rhetoric in 60 years of the People’s Daily.

* To see the full autumn 2016 schedule: 2016 Autumn Schedule

* Questions and concerns can be addressed to the student coordinator Yinxian Zhang (zyxzhang@uchicago.edu)

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology), Dali Yang (Political Science), and Dingxin Zhao (Sociology)


The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.