East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society

October 12, 2017
by xuhaitong
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East Asia Workshop: Oct. 17th, Thomas Telhelm, “The Rice Theory of Culture: Evidence that Historical Rice Farming Shaped Culture in Southern China”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 

“The Rice Theory of Culture: Evidence that Historical Rice Farming Shaped Culture in Southern China

 

Thomas Telhelm

Assistant Professor of Behavioral Science

University of Chicago

 

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, October 17th, 2017

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be provided*

 

Abstract

Cross-cultural psychologists have mostly contrasted Asia with the West. In this talk, the speaker will give evidence that there are significant cultural differences within China and within India. By testing 1,162 Han Chinese participants in six sites, the author found that people in southern China are more interdependent and holistic-thinking than people in the north. The author proposes that rice farming’s irrigation and high labor requirements gave southern China a tight, interdependent culture. In contrast, traditional wheat farming required less labor and less coordination, giving northern China a more free-wheeling independent culture. A separate study in India also revealed differences between traditional rice-farming and wheat-farming areas.

 

About the speaker

Thomas Talhelm studies how culture affects the way we behave. One of his recent major projects was studying how rice and wheat agriculture have given northern and southern China two very different cultures. His research has appeared in a variety of publications including Science, Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, and Current Directions in Psychological Science.

Thomas lived in China for five years teaching high school in Guangzhou as a Princeton in Asia fellow, as a freelance journalist in Beijing, and most recently as a Fulbright scholar and an NSF Graduate Research Fellow. While living in Beijing, Thomas founded Smart Air, a social enterprise that ships low-cost air purifiers to help people breathe clean air without shelling out thousands of dollars for expensive purifiers.

Thomas earned his Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of Virginia and a B.A. with Highest Honors in psychology and Spanish from the University of Michigan.

 

*To learn more about the workshop, please visit our workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

*Subscribe or unsubscribe to the workshop mailing-list at: https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/info/east-asia

*Questions and concerns can be addressed to the student coordinator Haitong Xu (xuhaitong@uchciago.edu) and Yang Xiang (xiangalan@uchicago.edu)

 

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology), xisong@uchicago.edu

Dali Yang (Political Science), daliyang@uchicago.edu

Dingxin Zhao (Sociology), dzhao@uchicago.edu

 

The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

October 12, 2017
by xuhaitong
0 comments

East Asia Workshop: Oct. 3rd, Xunchao Zhang, “Authoritarian Hawks: Authoritarianism as Microfoundations for Hawkish Foreign Policy Preferences in China”

East Asia Workshop: Politics, Economy and Society presents

 

Authoritarian Hawks: Authoritarianism as Microfoundations for Hawkish Foreign Policy Preferences in China”

 

Xunchao Zhang

Analyst at Program on Political Violence (PPV) at CPOST

University of Chicago

 

4:30-6:00p.m., Tuesday, October 3rd, 2017

Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Ave.

*Light refreshments will be provided*

 

Abstract

Who are the foreign policy hawks in China? Existing literature focuses on nationalism as an explanation for popular hawkishness. However, recent empirical examination of survey data has challenged the notion of rising nationalism as a source of Chinese hawkishness. Drawing on political psychology literature, I seek to explain the hawkish preferences of ordinary Chinese citizens as the consequence of a popular illiberal authoritarian ideology, rather than nationalism. There is scant literature examining the political manifestations of authoritarian dispositions in the foreign policy domain, and moreover, international relations (IR) researchers have paid more attention to authoritarian regimes as opposed to individuals who subscribe to authoritarian ideology. Hence, this paper is an attempt to bridge the authoritarian personality literature and the IR study of hawkishness. Using data generated by a large-scale opt-in survey as well as an original causal mediation experiment fielded in China, I argue that individual foreign policy hawkishness is a result of externalization of domestic authoritarianism political values, particularly collectivism and punitiveness

.

 

*To learn more about the workshop, please visit our workshop website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia/

*Subscribe or unsubscribe to the workshop mailing-list at: https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/info/east-asia

*Questions and concerns can be addressed to the student coordinator Haitong Xu (xuhaitong@uchciago.edu) and Yang Xiang (xiangalan@uchicago.edu)

 

Faculty sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology), xisong@uchicago.edu

Dali Yang (Political Science), daliyang@uchicago.edu

Dingxin Zhao (Sociology), dzhao@uchicago.edu

 

The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

October 12, 2017
by xuhaitong
0 comments

East Asia Workshop: Autumn 2017 Workshop Schedule

EAST ASIA WORKSHOP: POLITICS, ECONOMY & SOCIETY

Autumn 2017 Workshop Schedule

 

October 3

“Authoritarianism as Microfoundations for Hawkish Foreign Policy Preferences in China”

Xunchao Zhang

Analyst at Program on Political Violence (PPV) at CPOST

University of Chicago

 

October 17

“The rice theory of culture: Evidence historical rice farming shaped culture in southern China”

Thomas Telhelm

Assistant Professor of Behavioral Science

University of Chicago

 

October 27

“A Fence on which We can Rely: Asserting Sovereignty in Early Twentieth Century Southwest China”

Collaborate Event with the East Asia: Transregional Histories Workshop

Scott Relyea

Assistant Professor, Department of History

Appalachian State University

 

October 31

“Threats from Within Assessing the Diversionary Escalation Theory”

Wenyan Deng

Data Manager

University of Chicago

 

November 14

“Born-Global: Why Small Firms Love International Trade”

Wu Haichao

MAPSS Student

University of Chicago

 

November 28

“Biding Seats for High School Admissions In China”

Congyi Zhou & Tong Wang

PhD of the Harris School of Public Policy

University of Chicago

 

Unless otherwise stated, the East Asia Workshop meets on Every Other Tuesday 4:30-6pm at Pick Lounge, 5828 South University Avenue. This workshop features interdisciplinary scholarship addressing topics relating to social, political, economic as well as cultural matters and issues in East Asia. Our presenters come from various disciplines such as sociology, political science, economics, anthropology, history, etc. The goal of this workshop is to foster communication and collaboration among students and scholars whose interest lies in East Asia at the University of Chicago and in the wider East Asian Studies community.

 

* Abstract or description of each presentation will be posted on our website: http://cas.uchicago.edu/workshops/eastasia

* Questions and comments can be addressed to the student coordinators Haitong Xu: xuhaitong@uchicago.edu and Yang Xiang: xiangalan@uchicago.edu

* Subscribe or unsubscribe to our workshop mailing-list at: https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/info/east-asia

 

Faculty Sponsors:

Xi Song (Sociology), xisong@uchicago.edu

Dali Yang (Political Science), daliyang@uchicago.edu

Dingxin Zhao (Sociology), dzhao@uchicago.edu

 

The East Asia Workshop is sponsored by the Council on Advanced Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences. Persons with disabilities who believe they may need assistance please contact the student coordinator in advance.

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